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Screenshot from TAGSExplorerGiven the number researchers who ask me about access to historic Twitter data who end up disappointed to hear free access to search results are limited to the last 7 days I’m sure they will be pleased to hear about the Twitter Data Grants:

we’re introducing a pilot project we’re calling Twitter Data Grants, through which we’ll give a handful of research institutions access to our public and historical data.

This was an area I’d hoped the Library of Congress who’d have solved long ago given they were gifted the data in April 2010. Unfortunately despite the announcement in Jan 2013 that access was weeks away nothing has appeared.

It’s worth stressing that Twitter’s initial pilot will be limited to a small number of proposals, but those who do get access will have the opportunity to “collaborate with Twitter engineers and researchers”. This isn’t the first time Twitter have opened data to researchers having made data available for a Jisc funded project to analyse the London Riot and while I except Twitter end up with a handful of elite researchers/institutions hopefully the pilot will be extended.

Proposals for this pilot need to be in by 15 March. A link is included in the Introducing Twitter Data Grants page.

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Posted in Data, Research, Twitter on by .

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Mobile - TTRSS themeAfter my last post on ‘Thieving Feedly’, which got a lovely follow up on The Digital River, I mentioned that I’d uninstalled the Feedly Android app. That left a hole in my feed consumption ways which I think I’ve now filled. Below is a screenshot of how I’m now consuming my feeds. Those from the Google Reader good old days might recognise it. Yep if you can’t replace Google Reader then the best solution for me is to recreate it and this post outlines how I did it.

...continue reading

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Recently

Happy New Year to you too Simon! Having worked with Twitter and Google Maps API I was aware that their terms are becoming increasingly restrictive making the environment for 3rd party services for doing this increasingly difficult. There is a solution for doing using a modification of my Twitter Archiving Google Spreadsheet (TAGS) project (the guerrilla approach so to speak). The result for #rhizo14 is here (only viewable in non-mobile app versions of Google Maps and not the current preview version) and this post outlines how it was done. ...continue reading

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Gravitational collapse is the inward fall of a body due to the influence of its own gravity. [Ref]

The BBC recently ran another week of Stargazing Live where Professor Brian Cox and Dara O Briain try to educate us about the stars, the galaxies, the universes and everything else. I wasn’t intending to watch it but found myself hypnotically drawn in as the hosts and guests dangled some of the known and unknowns before us.

Perhaps whimsically I started think about the parallels between the universe and the internet. The ever expanding mass of stuff, 95% of which is made of ‘dark matter’ (the unknown entity that makes the equations balance). I’ve even done some of my own stargazing exploring the ds106 galaxy. The image below from this shows how the nebula of the interconnected blog posts, comments and tweets which form part of this open course.

ds106 Galaxy

Recently I’ve been seeing a number of cracks in the internet as external forces pull and push it into a shape it shouldn’t be. There are headline events like NSA hacking, ISP filtering/blocking, neutrality. In some ways equally, if not more dangerous, are the multitude or minor events, the things that don’t get headlined, the changes that go almost unnoticed. ...continue reading

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Posted in Web Literacy on by .

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Mike Caulfield has posted an interesting reflection:

Identity is now maintained on our phones. ... Our portal is our app screen. Our network isn’t Facebook or Google or Twitter. It’s the phone address book that is the union of those three imports. And on the phone we stop dreaming about “If only there was a service that integrated functions of Twitter, Gmail, and Snapchat!” Because there is a service that integrates that — your phone’s notifications screen ...continue reading

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One of the themes I expect to see for 2010 is more collaborative real-time interaction web applications.

was my bold prediction at the beginning of 2010 (who would want to be a futurologist ;). Mike Caulfield recently highlighted how the WebRTC specification, which permits real-time communication (audio, video, chat, screen interaction) in your browser with a bit of JavaScript and opens the opportunity for educators to more easily breakaway from learning designs created to fit traditional webinar platforms. As Mike highlights: ...continue reading

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Posted in Infrastructure on by .

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It’s been a while since I’ve done a review post but as this year has been a blur if for no one else I wanted to look at my posts from 2013. Rather than a look at everything I wanted to extract some themes and for this first review I wanted to look back at some of the work I’ve done around Google Apps Script and Google Spreadsheets/Sheets. ...continue reading

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Last week I was at the MOOC Research Initiative Conference in Texas. The organisers (George Siemens, Amy Collier, Tanya Joosten and others) should stand up and take a bow for a fantastic event. I’m still digesting my thoughts from the event which was full of extremes and at times completely surreal. I leave Arlington with memories of going from being baked at 28C to –10C icestorms; memories of trekking down the freeway with some of the best minds in EdTech trying to make it back to our hotel, spending time with people I’ve long respected including a couple of hours in the company of Martin Weller and Jim Groom the result of which was: ...continue reading

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A recent thought I’ve been pondering is the default closed approach to education. It’s interesting to reflect how the physical structure of the classroom with walls and doors gets replicated online with firewalls and logins. I can appreciate that in part this is needed to create a closed environment where the student feels safe and secure, but it is also has other factors like license to share copyrighted work or terms of license for learning platforms. It’s ironic that the ‘MOOC as a Service’ (MaaS/xMaaS) offering for Coursera, et al., whilst are open to register still default to a closed mode*, studying in their place under their terms. Even FutureLearn which is designed on social learning principles seems to only consider social in the system. ...continue reading

Here’s some posts which have caught my attention this month:

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Posted in Starred on by .